East India Destinations

November 27, 2017

India’s North East is a land of undulating hills and plains with luxuriant green cover and a wide variety or rare and exotic flora and fauna. Consisting of 7 states also called ‘Seven Sisters’ North East India has some real surprises for the travelers coming here. Not so much established on the travelers map, yet the North Eastern India, has its own charm that will sweep you off your feet. Come here for once and loose yourself in its charismatic magic.

Tourist Destinations in North East India


Kalimpong is a hill station in the Indian state of West Bengal. It is located at an average elevation of 1,250 metres (4,101 ft). The town is set to be the headquarters of the announced district of Kalimpong. The Indian Army’s 27 Mountain Division is located on the outskirts of the town. The Kalimpong is known for its educational institutions, many of which were established during the British colonial period. It used to be a gateway in the trade between Tibet and India before China’s annexation of Tibet and the Sino-Indian War.


Darjeeling is a town in India’s West Bengal state, in the Himalayan foothills. Once a summer resort for the British Raj elite, it remains the terminus of the narrow-gauge Darjeeling Himalayan Railway, or “Toy Train,” completed in 1881. It’s famed for the distinctive black tea grown on plantations that dot its surrounding slopes. Its backdrop is Mt. Kanchenjunga, among the world’s highest peaks.


Bagdogra, a small and tranquil town located in the northern part of West Bengal is a gateway to the famous hill station, Darjeeling. This place is situated just a few kilometers short of the Himalayan range and has a low hilly terrain which provides it with a serene and scenic environment of its own. Lush green tea gardens, hilly terrain, verdant meadows and a beautiful township provide a picturesque view to visitors here. The Teesta River flows near this town which adds to the beauty of the place.


Gangtok is the capital of the mountainous northern Indian state of Sikkim. Established as a Buddhist pilgrimage site in the 1840s, the city became capital of an independent monarchy after British rule ended, but joined India in 1975. Today, it remains a Tibetan Buddhist center and a base for hikers organizing permits and transport for treks through Sikkim’s Himalayan mountain ranges.

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